How Are Methadone and Suboxone Different? (2022)

How Are Methadone and Suboxone Different? (1)Share on Pinterest

SAFETY ALERT FOR ORAL BUPRENORPHINE

In January 2022, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning related to dental problems caused by buprenorphine when administered by dissolving in the mouth. This warning follows reports of dental problems including tooth decay, cavities, oral infections, and loss of teeth. This serious adverse effect can occur whether or not you’ve had a history of dental problems. The FDA emphasizes that buprenorphine is an important treatment for opioid use disorder and that the benefits of treatment outweigh these dental risks. If you currently take buprenorphine, continue taking it as prescribed. After the medication has completely dissolved in your mouth, take a large sip of water, swish it around gently, and then swallow. It is important to wait at least 1 hour before brushing your teeth. Contact your healthcare professional with any additional questions.

Chronic pain is pain that lasts for a long time. Opioids are strong medications prescribed to help relieve chronic pain. While they’re effective, these drugs can also be habit-forming and lead to addiction and dependence. So they must be used carefully.

Methadone and Suboxone are both opioids. While methadone is used to treat chronic pain and opioid addiction, Suboxone is only approved to treat opioid dependence. Read on to learn more about how these two drugs compare.

Methadone is a generic drug. Suboxone is the brand name of the medication buprenorphine/naloxone. Find out more about them below.

methadonebuprenorphine-naloxone
Dolophine, Methadone HCl Intensol, MethadoseSuboxone, Bunavail, Zubsolv
chronic pain, opioid addictionopioid dependence
yes, it’s a Schedule II controlled substanceyes, it’s a Schedule III controlled substance
yes†yes†
yes¥yes¥

* A controlled substance is a drug that is regulated by the government. If you take a controlled substance, your doctor must closely supervise your use. Never give a controlled substance to anyone else. Schedule II drugs have higher potential for addiction than Schedule III drugs.

† If you’ve been taking this drug for longer than a few weeks, don’t stop taking it without talking to your doctor. You’ll need to taper off the drug slowly to avoid withdrawal symptoms, such as anxiety, sweating, nausea, and trouble sleeping.

¥ This drug has a high misuse potential. This means you can get addicted to it. Be sure to take it exactly as your doctor tells you to. If you have questions or concerns, talk with your doctor.

Addiction is different from dependence.

(Video) Methadone vs Suboxone

Addiction occurs when you have uncontrollable cravings that cause you to keep using a drug. You can’t stop using the drug even though it leads to harmful results.

Dependence happens when your body physically adapts to a drug and becomes tolerant to it. This leads you to need more of the drug to create the same effect.

Methadone comes in these forms:

  • oral tablet
  • oral solution
  • oral concentrate
  • injectable solution
  • oral dispersible tablet, which must be dissolved in a liquid before you take it

Brand-name Suboxone comes as an oral film, which can be dissolved under your tongue (sublingual) or placed between your cheek and gums to dissolve (buccal).

Generic versions of buprenorphine/naloxone (the ingredients in Suboxone) are available as an oral film and a sublingual tablet.

Currently, there are large price differences between methadone and both generic and brand name Suboxone. Overall, both brand-name Suboxone and generic buprenorphine/naloxone are more expensive than methadone. For more information on medication prices, see GoodRx.com.

Many insurance companies require a prior authorization for methadone or Suboxone. This means your doctor will need to get approval from your insurance company before the company will pay for the prescription.

There are restrictions on how you can access these medications. These restrictions depend on the type of drug and why it’s being used.

Only methadone is approved to treat chronic pain. Methadone for pain relief is available at some pharmacies, but not all. Talk to your doctor about what pharmacies can fill a methadone prescription to treat chronic pain.

Both methadone and Suboxone can be used to help you get through the detoxification process for opioids.

Detoxification occurs when your body tries to get rid of a drug. During detoxification, you have withdrawal symptoms. Most withdrawal symptoms aren’t life threatening, but they’re very uncomfortable.

This is where methadone and Suboxone come in. They can reduce your withdrawal symptoms and your drug cravings.

Methadone and Suboxone both help manage detoxification, but the process for their use is different.

(Video) Choosing between Buprenorphine and Methadone

Treatment with methadone

When you use methadone for addiction treatment, you can only get it from certified opioid treatment programs. These include methadone maintenance clinics.

When starting treatment, you have to go to one of these clinics. A doctor observes you receiving each dose.

Once the clinic doctor decides you’re stable with methadone treatment, they may allow you to take the drug at home between visits to the clinic. If you take the medication at home, you still need to get it from a certified opioid treatment program.

Treatment with Suboxone

For Suboxone, you don’t need to go to a clinic to receive treatment. Your doctor will give you a prescription.

However, they will likely monitor the start of your treatment closely. They may require you to come to their office to get the medication. They may also observe you taking the drug.

If you’re allowed to take the drug at home, your doctor may not give you more than a few doses at a time. Over time, however, your doctor will likely allow you to manage your own treatment.

The charts below list examples of side effects of methadone and Suboxone.

lightheadedness
dizziness
fainting
sleepiness
nausea and vomiting
sweating
constipation
stomach pain
numbness in your mouth
swollen or painful tongue
redness inside your mouth
trouble paying attention
faster or slower heart rate
blurry vision
addiction
severe breathing problems
heart rhythm problems
problems with coordination
severe stomach pain
seizures
allergic reaction
opioid withdrawal
low blood pressure
liver problems

If you take more methadone or Suboxone than your doctor or clinic prescribes, it can cause an overdose. This can even lead to death. It’s critical that you take your drug exactly as directed.

Because both methadone and Suboxone are opioids, they can cause addiction and withdrawal symptoms. As a Schedule II drug, methadone has a higher risk of misuse than Suboxone.

Symptoms of withdrawal from either medication can vary widely in severity from one person to another. Typically, withdrawal from methadone can last about 2 to 3 weeks, while symptoms of withdrawal from Suboxone can last from one to several months.

Symptoms of opioid withdrawal can include:

(Video) Doctor Explains the Difference Between Methadone, Naltrexone (Vivitrol), and Suboxone

  • shaking
  • sweating
  • feeling hot or cold
  • runny nose
  • watery eyes
  • goose bumps
  • diarrhea
  • nausea or vomiting
  • muscle aches or muscle cramps
  • trouble sleeping (insomnia)

Don’t stop taking either drug on your own. If you do, your withdrawal symptoms will get worse.

If you need to stop taking your drug, your doctor will slowly lower your dosage over time to help prevent withdrawal symptoms. For more information, read about coping with opiate withdrawal or going through methadone withdrawal.

Examples of withdrawal effects from methadone and Suboxone are as follows:

cravings
trouble sleeping
diarrhea
nausea and vomiting
depression and anxiety
muscle aches
fever, chills, and sweating
hot and cold flashes
tremors
hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that aren’t there)
headache
trouble concentrating

Suboxone and methadone can also cause withdrawal syndrome in a newborn if you take either drug during pregnancy. You may notice:

  • crying more than usual
  • irritability
  • overactive behaviors
  • trouble sleeping
  • high-pitched cry
  • tremor
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • not being able to gain weight

Both methadone and Suboxone can interact with other medications. In fact, methadone and Suboxone share many of the same drug interactions.

Examples of drugs that methadone and Suboxone may interact with include:

  • benzodiazepines, such as alprazolam (Xanax), lorazepam (Ativan), and clonazepam (Klonopin)
  • sleep aids, such as zolpidem (Ambien), eszopiclone (Lunesta), and temazepam (Restoril)
  • anesthesia medications
  • other opioids, such as buprenorphine (Butrans) and butorphanol (Stadol)
  • antifungal medications, such as ketoconazole, fluconazole (Diflucan), and voriconazole (Vfend)
  • antibiotics, such as erythromycin (Erythrocin) and clarithromycin (Biaxin)
  • antiseizure drugs, such as phenytoin (Dilantin), phenobarbital (Solfoton), and carbamazepine (Tegretol)
  • HIV drugs, such as efavirenz (Sustiva) and ritonavir (Norvir)

In addition to this list, methadone also interacts with other medications. These include:

  • heart rhythm drugs, such as amiodarone (Pacerone)
  • antidepressants, such as amitriptyline, citalopram (Celexa), and quetiapine (Seroquel)
  • monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAIOs), such as selegiline (Emsam) and isocarboxazid (Marplan)
  • anticholinergic medications, such as benztropine (Cogentin), atropine (Atropen), and oxybutynin (Ditropan XL)

Methadone and Suboxone can cause problems if you take them when you have certain health issues. If you have any of these, you should discuss your safety with your doctor before taking methadone or Suboxone:

  • kidney disease
  • liver disease
  • breathing problems
  • misuse of other drugs
  • alcohol addiction
  • mental health problems

Also talk to your doctor before taking methadone if you have:

  • heart rhythm problems
  • seizures
  • stomach problems such as bowel blockage or narrowing of your intestines

Talk to your doctor before taking Suboxone if you have:

  • adrenal gland problems

Talk with your doctor

(Video) Methadone vs Suboxone: What's Better for Heroin Treatment? | Dr. B

Methadone and Suboxone have many similarities and some key differences. Some of the more important differences between these drugs may include their:

  • drug forms
  • risk of addiction
  • cost
  • accessibility
  • side effects
  • drug interactions

Your doctor can tell you more about these differences. If you need treatment for opioid addiction, your doctor is the best place to start. They can recommend the best drug to help you get healthy.

Q:

Why can opioid withdrawal occur as a side effect of Suboxone?

Anonymous patient

A:

Taking Suboxone can lead to opioid withdrawal symptoms, especially if the dose is too high. This is because Suboxone contains the drug naloxone. This drug is added to Suboxone to discourage people from injecting or snorting it.

If you inject or snort Suboxone, the naloxone may cause withdrawal symptoms. But if you take Suboxone by mouth, your body absorbs very little of the naloxone component, so the risk of withdrawal symptoms is low.

Taking high doses of Suboxone by mouth may still cause withdrawal symptoms, however.

(Video) Webisode 12 – Methadone vs. Buprenorphine

Healthline Medical TeamAnswers represent the opinions of our medical experts. All content is strictly informational and should not be considered medical advice.

FAQs

Does methadone work better than Suboxone? ›

Which Has More Effectiveness, Methadone or Suboxone? Professionals measure the effectiveness of a MAT medication by its ability to reduce the patient's opioid use. In this sense, Suboxone and methadone have similar results. Research shows that methadone and Suboxone have equal success rates in lowering opiate use.

Is Suboxone equivalent to methadone? ›

Methadone and Suboxone are both opioids. While methadone is used to treat chronic pain and opioid addiction, Suboxone is only approved to treat opioid dependence.

Do methadone and Suboxone have the same ingredients? ›

Do methadone and Suboxone have the same ingredients? No, they are different medications with different ingredients. Methadone only has one ingredient, methadone hydrochloride. Suboxone is a combination of two medications, buprenorphine and naloxone.

Is methadone stronger than BUPE? ›

In terms of medication assisted treatment for opioid disorders, methadone, which predates buprenorphine by almost three decades, may be more effective and have higher rates of patient retention than buprenorphine.

Is it hard to switch from methadone to Suboxone? ›

Patients find it very challenging to transfer from methadone to Suboxone as a result of methadone's long half-life and strong attachment to the opioid receptors. Patients need to reduce their dose down to thirty to forty milligrams of methadone then take their last dose 72 hours before taking Suboxone.

Can you drive a car while on methadone? ›

Driving under the influence of methadone is not against the law, according to Gus Lopez, of the California Highway Patrol. California/s vehicle code section 23152(c) states: "It is unlawful for any person who is addicted to the use of any drug to drive a vehicle.

What medications can you not take with Suboxone? ›

Drugs that can have negative effects when taken with Suboxone include: Benzodiazepines, such as Xanax (alprazolam), Klonopin (clonazepam), Valium (diazepam), Ativan (lorazepam) and Restoril (temazepam).

Can I use Suboxone for pain? ›

Suboxone can help patients simultaneously manage chronic pain and the uncomfortable symptoms during withdrawal from opioids. Individuals with opioid use disorder and chronic pain have a higher risk of overdose when they take certain pain medications, but Suboxone can reduce their pain while helping them avoid relapse.

What pain meds can you take with Suboxone? ›

Managing non-surgical short and long-term pain while on Suboxone. Maximizing non-opioid pain medications (i.e., non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs - NSAIDs - and acetaminophen) whenever possible and not contraindicated is the preferred first-line treatment.

Is it hard to get on Suboxone? ›

It's called Suboxone, but government regulations and individual doctors have made it difficult to get, which is leading many to buy it illegally. A lot of people using Suboxone for the first time don't get it at a doctor's office.

What is the success rate of Suboxone? ›

In reality, Suboxone success rates have been reported as high as 40 to 60%. These numbers are measured by recovery program retention rates and one-year sobriety post-treatment.

Does Suboxone make you gain weight? ›

Although Suboxone doesn't directly cause you to gain weight, it can cause water retention, which manifests as more-than-usual puffiness around the face, feet, and hands.

What is the strongest painkiller? ›

Vivien Williams: Fentanyl is a powerful painkiller. Mike Hooten, M.D. (Anethesiology, Mayo Clinic): It is many, many times more potent than morphine, oxycodone, oxycontin, Vicadin, dilaudid, hydromorphine, all these types of drugs. Vivien Williams: Mayo Clinic pain management specialist Dr.

Does methadone have a ceiling effect? ›

The first is a full agonist and the one typically used for treatment is methadone. It most closely resembles heroin and can remain in the body for up to 59 hours. It does not have a drug ceiling and is most useful for treating patients who have been using substances for a long period of time.

How long do they keep you on methadone? ›

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse publication Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment: A Research-Based Guide (Third Edition), the length of methadone treatment should be a minimum of 12 months. Some patients may require long-term maintenance.

How many hours after methadone can I take Suboxone? ›

If you are transferring to Suboxone® from methadone maintenance, your dose has to be tapered until you have been at or below 30mg for at least a week. There must be at least 24 hours (preferably longer) between the time you take your last methadone dose and the time you are given your first dose of buprenorphine.

What happens if you take methadone and buprenorphine together? ›

Interactions between your drugs

Talk to your doctor before using buprenorphine together with methadone. Combining these medications may reduce the analgesic effect of methadone and/or increase the risk of a relatively rare but potentially life-threatening irregular heart rhythm.

What can I take in place of methadone? ›

Buprenorphine: an alternative to methadone for heroin dependence treatment.

Does methadone cause personality changes? ›

Significant correlations were observed between increased methadone dosage and antisocial personality disorder. In addition, significant positive correlations were observed between increased methadone dosage and Hamilton anxiety scores, Hamilton depression scores and Young Mania scores.

Does methadone ease pain? ›

Methadone is used to treat moderate to severe pain when around-the-clock pain relief is needed for a long period of time. This medicine should not be used to treat pain that you only have once in a while or "as needed".

Is methadone and hydrocodone the same? ›

Similar to oxycodone, methadone is also a federally controlled Schedule II drug in the U.S. Hydrocodone is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic derived from codeine. Hydrocodone is pharmacologically 2-8 times more potent than codeine as an antitussive agent.

What is the ceiling on Suboxone? ›

The ceiling effect means that Suboxone will produce a certain degree of euphoria and pain relief but that effect will be maximized at a moderate dose and will not continue to increase at higher and higher doses.

How many mg of Suboxone can you take in a day? ›

The suggested target total dose for Day One is in the range of 8 - 16 mg Suboxone Film. A maximum daily dose of 32 mg should not be exceeded. During the initiation of treatment, patients need frequent monitoring. Suboxone Film should be dispensed in multiple doses over the first 4 to 6 hours of the transfer.

What are the negative side effects of Suboxone? ›

Suboxone is not without side effects and withdrawal effects. Side effects of Suboxone may include dizziness or blurred vision, drowsiness, headache, back pain, tongue pain, numbness or tingling, increased sweating, nausea, vomiting, constipation, and insomnia.

How do I know if I need more Suboxone? ›

If you are taking buprenorphine (Suboxone®) for pain, and you are not taking any other opioids, the dose may need to be increased if you are still in pain and it isn't well controlled. The lowest dose for pain can be 2 mg. For chronic pain, you would typically be taking a dose three times a day.

Does Suboxone make you sleepy? ›

Yes, Suboxone can make you sleepy. Drowsiness, fatigue, and sedation are commonly listed side effects of Suboxone and other buprenorphine-containing medications. This is because Suboxone activates the brain's opioid receptors, and all opioids have the potential to cause sleepiness.

Can you take gabapentin and Suboxone at the same time? ›

Yes, you can potentially take gabapentin and Suboxone together, but there are potential risks. You should only do so under direct medical supervision. Medications can interact in unintentional ways, so they should never be mixed without explicit direction from a medical professional.

Is OxyContin still prescribed? ›

OxyContin, a trade name for the narcotic oxycodone hydrochloride, is a painkiller available in the United States only by prescription. OxyContin is legitimately prescribed for relief of moderate to severe pain resulting from injuries, bursitis, neuralgia, arthritis, and cancer.

Why would a doctor prescribe Suboxone? ›

Suboxone is a prescription medication used in treating those addicted to Opioids, illegal or prescription. It contains the ingredients Buprenorphine and Naloxone. Buprenorphine, a partial Opioid agonist, blocks the Opiate receptors and reduces a person's urges.

Is there a Suboxone shot? ›

No, but Sublocade is often called the Suboxone shot by non-medical professionals because it uses the same anti-craving medication buprenorphine. Sublocade is an injectable, long-acting form of buprenorphine. Suboxone is a daily-use, sublingual form of buprenorphine that also includes naloxone.

How successful is methadone? ›

Methadone maintenance is associated with success rates ranging from 60 – 90%. The longer the people are in this modality the greater their chances are of achieving stable long-term abstinence.”

Does Suboxone make your hair fall out? ›

Hair loss is not a side effect that has been reported in studies of Suboxone. However, some people who take Suboxone have reported having hair loss.

Does Suboxone make your legs swell? ›

Although uncommon, leg and feet swelling are listed as infrequent side effects of Suboxone. There can also be fluid retention in the hands and arms. By definition, an infrequent side effect means that 1/100 - 1/1000 people experience it. It is not a serious side effect if it is being caused by Suboxone.

What happens if u swallow a Suboxone? ›

Nothing will happen if you swallow Suboxone. The stomach and small intestine do not absorb buprenorphine well, so you won't experience euphoric effects or relief from withdrawal symptoms. Suboxone should only betaken as prescribed. Suboxone is a medication designed to be taken sublingually, or underneath your tongue.

Is gabapentin an opioid? ›

Gabapentin is not a narcotic. It's not classified as a controlled substance in most states. (Kentucky, West Virginia, Michigan, Tennessee, and Virginia have reclassified gabapentin as a Schedule V controlled substance). Gabapentin is not an opioid.

What are the positive effects of methadone? ›

Benefits of methadone therapy include: Reduction in infectious disease due to stopping opiate abuse, particularly injection drug abuse. Reduction in criminal activity due to stopping illicit drug use. Overall improvement in quality of life.

How much methadone can you take in a day? ›

Adults—At first, 20 to 30 milligrams (mg) taken as a single dose per day. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 40 mg per day. Do not take more than your prescribed dose in 24 hours.

Why do you fail to maximize the benefits of methadone and buprenorphine? ›

“As with MMT [methadone maintenance treatment], there is growing evidence that higher doses of buprenorphine (16–32 mg) are more efficacious than lower doses; however, because of the pharmacology of buprenorphine, doses above 32 mg do not provide additional efficacy.”

Does methadone show up on a drug test? ›

When patients are using methadone as part of their recovery treatment plan, they often ask whether or not having the drug in their system will make them test positive on a drug test. While specific methadone drug tests do exist, the use of methadone does not typically show up on a standard urine drug test.

What is another name for methadone? ›

Methadone, sold under the brand names Dolophine and Methadose among others, is a synthetic opioid agonist used for chronic pain and also for opioid dependence. It is used to treat chronic pain, and it is also used to treat addiction to heroin or other opioids.

How long does it take a person to overcome their addiction? ›

Most addicted individuals need at least three months in treatment to get sober and initiate a plan for continued recovery. Research shows that the best outcomes occur with longer durations of treatment. Lengthier treatment programs can seem intimidating at first, but they may end up bringing you the best results.

What is the success rate of Suboxone? ›

In reality, Suboxone success rates have been reported as high as 40 to 60%. These numbers are measured by recovery program retention rates and one-year sobriety post-treatment.

How does methadone work for addiction? ›

Methadone is a synthetic opioid agonist that eliminates withdrawal symptoms and relieves drug cravings by acting on opioid receptors in the brain—the same receptors that other opioids such as heroin, morphine, and opioid pain medications activate.

Can you operate heavy equipment on methadone? ›

This medication comes in the form of tablets, oral dispersible tablets, an oral solution (liquid), or injections. It is usually taken one to three times daily. Common side effects include dizziness, drowsiness, nausea, and constipation. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how methadone affects you.

How often can you take methadone? ›

When methadone is used to relieve pain, it may be taken every 8 to 12 hours. If you take methadone as part of a treatment program, your doctor will prescribe the dosing schedule that is best for you.

What pain meds can you take with Suboxone? ›

Managing non-surgical short and long-term pain while on Suboxone. Maximizing non-opioid pain medications (i.e., non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs - NSAIDs - and acetaminophen) whenever possible and not contraindicated is the preferred first-line treatment.

What is the maximum amount of Suboxone per day? ›

The recommended target dosage of SUBOXONE sublingual film during maintenance is 16 mg/4 mg buprenorphine/naloxone/day as a single daily dose. Dosages higher than 24 mg/6 mg daily have not been demonstrated to provide a clinical advantage.

What medications can you not take with Suboxone? ›

Drugs that can have negative effects when taken with Suboxone include: Benzodiazepines, such as Xanax (alprazolam), Klonopin (clonazepam), Valium (diazepam), Ativan (lorazepam) and Restoril (temazepam).

How long do they keep you on methadone? ›

For methadone maintenance, 12 months is considered the minimum, and some opioid-addicted individuals continue to benefit from methadone maintenance for many years.

What should you not take with methadone? ›

What should I avoid while taking methadone? Avoid drinking alcohol, using sedatives, or other opioid pain medications (such as codeine, hydrocodone, oxycodone, or morphine), or using illegal drugs while you are taking methadone. They may increase adverse effects (e.g., sedation, overdose, death) of the medication.

What is considered high doses of methadone? ›

Adults—At first, 20 to 30 milligrams (mg) taken as a single dose per day. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 40 mg per day. Do not take more than your prescribed dose in 24 hours.

Does methadone show up on a drug test? ›

When patients are using methadone as part of their recovery treatment plan, they often ask whether or not having the drug in their system will make them test positive on a drug test. While specific methadone drug tests do exist, the use of methadone does not typically show up on a standard urine drug test.

Can you take gabapentin and methadone? ›

The results showed that gabapentin is an effective adds-on therapy when is added to methadone. This drug leads to relief of withdrawal symptoms and lower methadone consumption.

Is OxyContin still prescribed? ›

OxyContin, a trade name for the narcotic oxycodone hydrochloride, is a painkiller available in the United States only by prescription. OxyContin is legitimately prescribed for relief of moderate to severe pain resulting from injuries, bursitis, neuralgia, arthritis, and cancer.

Is 120 mg of methadone a lot? ›

Patients should be reviewed prior to each dose increase. The average effective dose of methadone is 60–120 mg.

Why are people given methadone? ›

Methadone is a medication used in medication-assisted treatment (MAT) to help people reduce or quit their use of heroin or other opiates. Methadone has been used for decades to treat people who are addicted to heroin and narcotic pain medicines. When taken as prescribed, it is safe and effective.

Is methadone a lifetime drug? ›

Does methadone maintenance treatment last a lifetime? The length of treatment time varies depending on the person. Some patients remain in treatment for several years and others for the rest of their lives. The latter only equals about 5 to 20 percent of patients.

Videos

1. How Opioid Treatment Medications Work On Your Brain | San Diego Union-Tribune
(The San Diego Union-Tribune)
2. Heroin Effects and Treatment: Methadone Suboxone and Vivitrol
(Carrier Clinic)
3. Living Proof: Methadone and Buprenorphine for Opioid Addiction: Erik
(NYCHealth)
4. From Methadone to Suboxone treatment
(Trifecta Health)
5. Suboxone vs Methadone? (From Experienced User)
(Derek Lambert)
6. The best opioid addiction treatment is more opioids
(VICE News)

Top Articles

You might also like

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Lidia Grady

Last Updated: 09/08/2022

Views: 6235

Rating: 4.4 / 5 (65 voted)

Reviews: 88% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Lidia Grady

Birthday: 1992-01-22

Address: Suite 493 356 Dale Fall, New Wanda, RI 52485

Phone: +29914464387516

Job: Customer Engineer

Hobby: Cryptography, Writing, Dowsing, Stand-up comedy, Calligraphy, Web surfing, Ghost hunting

Introduction: My name is Lidia Grady, I am a thankful, fine, glamorous, lucky, lively, pleasant, shiny person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.